mituns: (freiheit)
One day, when I was a senior in college I ended up talking with an older, international student in the basement of the library. We talked about a range of things and I think that it was interesting to him to get the perspective of an American, but by the time I had to make it to my next class (or whatever it was I was going to) I was pretty creeped out, and I made sure I ducked into a building I really wasn't headed to so that this man wouldn't know where I was going.

The reason for my discomfort? In the course of the conversation, he, of course, was trying to ascertain my status. (I say "of course" because it's a very run-of-the-mill question in college.) The conversation went on, but he started to try to make the point that it was only with the experience of sex could one have any true "perspective" of the world. This wasn't some passing comment or throwaway line that he was parroting, but a sentiment that he seemed to be really stuck on.

Now, the sentiment itself is creepy enough, but probably the creepier part is that the insinuation seemed to be "Hey girl, why don't you leave the library with me and let me give you some "perspective" on the world." Of course, after relaying the story to some of my close friends, gaining "perspective" came to be a running joke among us.

As creepy as the whole encounter was, I can't necessarily say that this man was doing anything but repeating what secular morality would have people believe. In days past, Descartes reasoned, "I think, therefore I am," which, among other things, indicates the supremacy of reason in the human being. These days, that mantra seems to have been changed to "I have sex, therefore I am," which is a complete reversal of the supremacy of the intellect to the supremacy of emotion.

At least with Descartes', the premise is universal; even if we don't understand exactly what goes on in the minds of people who have had extensive brain injuries, for example, it's difficult to say that there is nothing going on there. However, with the latter premise, not only does it fail logically, as there is no "magic perspective" or "personhood" granted to one for having sex, it doesn't take into account that there are tons of people, such as children, who shouldn't be having sex.

The Biblical standard for sex is that it's something that is reserved for married couples. For as long as I can remember, popular culture has rebelled against this, characterizing it as prudish and unrealistic, while feeding us a constant diet of why it is "okay" for people to have sex whenever they want. After all, One doesn't even need to go into the moral implications, however, to understand that when sex is reserved for marriage, it brings both partners into an equality that merely "succumbing to the urge" cannot.

I sincerely believe that the promotion of all sorts of promiscuous sexual behavior is not just one way to try to mock Christian morality, but also is a means to make people slaves of their own passions. After all, a person who has been trained to "do what feels good" has hardly built up the sort of moral fortitude needed to forgo pleasure when times would call upon this individual to stick to logic to accomplish a "higher" mission.
mituns: (Default)
I happened to randomly catch the tail end of a radio program, and as their last item, they announced a "notable" death, which, in itself, is not all that uncommon. The thing is, the person who died was known for his work in the "adult entertainment" industry.

Now, there are many times when I don't recognize who people are in celebrity gossip, or have any idea who is supposedly famous. On the radio show, there were two announcers, one male and one female. The man announced the death, and the woman seemed puzzled for a moment. The man repeated the name in a suggestive tone, and the woman responded by saying, "Oh THAT ______" and tittered on air. Not only was the tittering unprofessional and jarring, but it says something when a national radio program finds it proper to announce this person's death as a "celebrity", apparently, on the assumption that everybody is watching porn.
mituns: (czech cross)
Just a thought, so bear with me...

The generation who came of age in the 1960s in the US are probably the last ones who still majorally attended church on a regular basis. Their children, in which generation I belong, were the ones who were taught what a drag it was to go to church every week, but may still have gone now and then for Christmas, or when in the company of grandparents. Furthermore, we still understand certain Biblical references, such as "the good Samaritan" or "the prodigal son". The children of my kids' generation, though, are ones who, I would assume, not only have no experience with church, but also don't even understand the most basic principles set forth by Christianity.

On one hand, we can complain about "losing the culture"; on the other, we need to understand that the fields are fallow, and we are being called, as the apostles were, to spread the Gospel to the ears who have never heard it.

Profile

mituns: (Default)
mituns

September 2013

S M T W T F S
1234 567
891011121314
15161718192021
22232425262728
2930     

Syndicate

RSS Atom

Most Popular Tags

Style Credit

Expand Cut Tags

No cut tags
Page generated Aug. 22nd, 2017 09:23 am
Powered by Dreamwidth Studios